BEST MEAT SAUCE EVER

Meat sauce should be all about the meat. It should have deep, rich beef-y flavor that is so delicious and mildly addictive that technically you could eat it all by itself with just a spoon. 

Like any good sauce based food though, it needs to flavorful enough so that the taste totally stands out when eaten with a some good baguette, over past, rice or even zoodles. 

That is what this meat sauce is about. Flavor, texture and taste. 

I can’t take the credit it bc I learned how to make meat sauce from the my mother, who taught me all about not overworking the meat and teaching me the  joys of a textured sauce! 

So thanks mom! 

Make sure to double the recipe, bc meat sauce freezes amazing, is loved by all and can help you on a busy when you need a fast dinner! 

For the printable Meat Sauce recipe click here

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5 EASY MARINADES, 1 HOUR – stock your freezer with 5 premartinated proteins in no time! PART 1

 

“Stocking your freezer is easy to do. Stocking your freezer the RIGHT WAY, is an art form.” -Me

Ok, so thats not a deeply profound quote that I suspect anyone will ever repeat, but I don’t think it’s a super important and helpful tip for the upcoming holiday season!

It’s super imoprtant to know what to freeze and what not to freezer. Especially when it come to protein. Don’t freeze a cooked steak. It will not be delicious. No matter how you freeze it, or how you defrost it. Do not freeze a cooked standing rib roast. I know there are some who do, but I’m against it. A giant hunk of meat, not covered in sauce, will take for ever to defrost and by the time it does the meat will have a weird freezer-y (yup, its a word) taste!

Here’s what you should freeze:

  • Raw proteins that are pre-marinaded. 

Why? Because in this situation the freezing will actually enhance the quality of the meat. The marinade will penetrate the protein in a much more flavor inducing way and all you have to do when you want to eat is defrost and follow the cooking instructions!

  • Proteins that are braised. 

Why? Something about the liquids it cooks in keeps the meats very soft and very tender even after defrosting and reheating. There sone key rule to braising though. The protein must NOT be removed from the cooking liquids until it has completely cooled. That means no touching. At all! The eat will completely dry out. During the cooling process the meat will reabsorb a lot of those cooking juices and if you take it out it won’t have any juicy goodness to soak up.

  • Cakes and cookies!

Why? No idea but they freeze and defrost beautifully. I actually find that some cakes taste better after they’ve defrosted from the freezer. My only rule with freezing baked goods is that they must be left whole. No cutting a cake in half. Sorry! Wrap the baked goods in a few layers of saran wrap and then foil to keep them safely away from any possible freezer burn. 

For part 1 of these5 easy marinades I’m giving you 3 recipes. 

   

Miso + Apricot Roasted Turkey Breast 

Garlic + Rosemary Lamb Shoulder

and

Duck Fat Roasted Breast Of Veal

All of these can be marinaded in minutes and cooked up fresh,  simply and easily!

HAPPY FREEZING EVERYONE!

For the Miso + Apricot Roasted Turkey Breast recipe, click here

For the Garlic + Rosemary Lamb Shoulder recipe, click here

For the Duck Fat Roasted Breast Of Veal recipe, click here

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SPICY PEANUT + SESAME SPIRALIZED ZUCCHINI SALAD

Sometime, a picture just says it all.

Texture, color, taste… They’re all there. 

The recipe is big because one serving of this salad will never be enough. There’s even dressing to make a half batch of salad next week, when you can’t get these flavors out of your head.

You’re welcome. 

Also, because I know you love links, click here to buy the julienne peeler I use on amazon!

For the printable Spiralized Zucchini Salad recipe click here

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SAVORY JAMS + SAUSAGE BOARDS

Here’s the thing. Pesach is all about the proteins. Fine, potatoes also but this post os just about the proteins. We’re talking everything from beef, lamb, veal, chicken, turkey duck and eggs! It’s all good and all delicious. For some reason though, because we are limited in the products we can use on Pesach we have this idea in our head that all the food is “simple”. In reality that couldn’t be farther from the truth. 

How many of us actually use products to cook our proteins with anyway? Maybe the occasional quick recipe will use an already bottled sauce or an ethic recipe will call for an ingredient that although could totally be kosher for Pesach just doesn’t have certification. Really though, with a little bit of research into those flavors you can reproduce so much of them using the limited ingredients we have access to on Pesach.

But wait.

There is another option. 

We. can take our proteins and go in another direction completely. An all together easier, but equally delicious directions. We can leave the proteins very lightly seasoned with basic staples like salt, pepper and garlic. Then we can create a variety of our own condiments to serve along side our proteins. Beside for how awesome it is to have a fridge stocked with the right sauces, salads, dips and jams it is also super convenient if you have to feed lots of people with different food preferences. Like I said in my last blog post, keeping a well stocked fridge on Pesach is half the battle when you need to feed people every single meal for more than a week! 

I like to serve huge platters of proteins every night. Then I switch up the accouterments each night so things don’t get boring. I try to have the proteins stick to a theme. Every night I serve one tip of chicken, think chicken legs, cutlets, pargiyot or wings. Then I add in a meat. Somenights its veal ribs and veal chops. Other nights ill go the lamb route and serve baby lamb chops and keftas. If I could find kosher for Pesach sausages I by a variety of those and serve them on a huge platter with the jams. It keeps the dinners interesting but still super easy and quick to create!

Here’s all the added advantages to this style of Pesach cooking:

  • Have more free time on Pesach by spending one day stuck in the kitchen making all the dips, salads, jams and condiments then spend the rest of Pesach throwing meals together in no time at all!
  • Feed lots of people exactly what they want but serving simply season proteins and letting everyone build their own plates with whichever flavors they like!
  • Since proteins can go on a grill or under a boiler, the only dishes you’ll have to do each night are the ones you eat off of!

and last but not least…

  • Your food will be infinitely more delicious!

My last suggestions, which is really more of a strongly advised statement is make all your accoutrement parve. After you turn over your kitchen, make sure to do these first. Double and triple the recipes you love so that they last the whole yuntiv because you are going to want to eat them with every single meal!

Happy Cleaning Everyone!

*NOTE: These recipes call for already sautéed onions. I start off all my Pesach cooking with 40 onions that I cook on low heat for 5-6 hours until they are golden and practically melted. I wrote up about how I do it in my last blog post!

For the printable MELTED PEPPERS AND ONION JAM click here

For the printable FENNEL AND ONION JAM click here

For the printable JALAPENO AND ONION JAM click here

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CHIMMISCHUG PESTO + HOW DIPS & SALADS CAN YOUR CHANGE PESACH FOREVER!

I hear a lot of complaining from people that all they have to eat on Pesach is chicken, meat and potatoes. I get it. Everyone missed their bread and their oats. But you know what, chicken, meat and potatoes are awesome! They are blank canvases that can pair with a huge palette of sauces, dips and salads. (Like how did that canvases, palettes…)

I have a few tricks snd some staple dips that I make in huge batches on the first day of my Pesach cooking. They stay beautifully in the fridge all Pesach long and switch up which ones I serve at each meal! 

I’ve said it about a million times by now but I’ll say it again. I LOVE PESACH! It’s the beginning of nice weather here in Israel and that means it’s officially barbecue season! We grill up a variety of different proteins every single night and serve them with all the fridge staple dips!

Before I start giving you a few of my best staple tips and dips heres a few things to keep in mind:

  • I like to make all my dips and base ingredients first so that they are parve. This way I can use and serve them with everything!
  • Adjust the flavors to your families preferences. If you don’t like cilantro, swap it for parsley. Spicy foods are not your thing…Leave the heat element out!
  • Double or triple each recipe. Starting from scratch the second days is just not fun. So make sure to make enough of everything so that it lasts you the whole holiday.        

SAUTEED ONIONS:

The first thing I always do is sautée up 40 onions. Yup, that’s right 40. Why so many? We go through tons and tons of onions on Pesach. They get smothered on chicken, add to hash browns, mixed into our eggs, turned into dips and layered into our yapsik.

  • I use my food processor’s slicing blade to cut them into really thin strips (takes 5 to cut 40 onions, it’s amazing!)
  • Add them to a huge pot with a few tbsp oil, 1 tbsp salt and little crushed black pepper.
  • Set the fire to medium heat, cover the pot and cook for 5 minutes.
  • Once a little water has come out of the onions, remove the cover, lower the heat to medium low and cook for 5-6 hours till they are a deep golden color and have a beautiful melty texture!

Garlic flavored oil:

The second thing I do is peel about 20 cloves of garlic. I do three things with the cloves.

  • I take about 16 cloves and add them to a large 16 oz jar. Fill the jar up to the top with whichever oil you prefer. Stick it in to the fridge and then any time you need oil for sauteeing, salad dressings, searing meat or marinades use your garlic oil. It is the ultimate flavor booster!
  • The second thing I like to do is right away make a few batches of confit garlic. All you do is stick however many cloves of garlic you want into an over proof dish. Add whatever spices or herbs you like and little salt and pepper. Cover the garlic with olive oil, wrap dish tightly in foil and bake in a 350f oven for about 35-40 minutes. 
  • Lastly and probably most importantly, take the rest of the cloves and stick them right into the food processor. Pulse until all the garlic is minced. (be careful not to over pulse or it will turn into a puree) Mix in a few tbsp of canola oil and pour all the minced garlic into an airtight jar. Top off with a little more oil and pop in the fridge. Your cooking will be sooooo much easier!

Salatim:

This is probably the most food enhancing part of all my Pesach cooking. We like strong flavors around here and the right kind of dips and salatim enhance all food. 

Weather I serve chicken, meat, potatoes or eggs everything gets served with a different salad or dip. This way, evenjhough were technically eating the same foods over and over, they’re always paired with different flavors so nothing gets boring.CLICK ON THE LINKS TO GET THESE RECIPES!

Heres this years newest addition:

SPICY CHIMMISCHUG PESTO

Here’s a few more we can’t do without:

ALMOND “TECHINA”

GARLIC MAYO

TOMATO DIP

GARLIC CONFIT

JALAPENO LEMON GREMOLATA

OLIVE TAPENADE

ROASTED RED PEPPER DIP

 

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ORANGE & WHITE WINE MORROCAN BRAISED LAMB

SHABBOS

If you come here to peas love & carrots often, you know that normally the words just flow for me (the spelling not so much…). For some reason though, as I sit down to type up my thoughts on shabbos I feel like I’m struggling to properly put my feelings to words that accurately describe them. 

I’m conflicted between the spiritual side of me that loves to disconnect from our crazy world and take time to reconnect to our Creator and people we love, and the side of me that knows that as a mother of young children, shabbos doesn’t really mean a day of rest. 

I love to cook beautiful and delicious foods that are served on platters befitting the holiness of the day. I love to set the table with my nicest dishes and glasses. I adorn every plate with cloth napkins dressed in my favorite napkin rings. I start out shabbos with a sparkling kitchen, counters that are spotless, and everything in it’s place.

Then comes time to light the candles. It’s truly my favorite time of the week. In that millisecond where the whole world changes from a place that wasn’t something special and then with a simple bracha became a world filled with  holiness I am overcome by my desire to be close to Hashem and his Torah. 

All of that is real for me and inspires me. These days though shabbos also means something else. With a house full of little kids, it means serving food, clearing the table, sweeping, rinsing, resetting the table, heating up more food, serving more food and clearing more plates in addition to getting kids dressed, getting them redressed after they took off their clothing, picking up toys, changing diapers, and finding lost shoes. 

Sometimes it’s difficult to remember what excalty it is I love about shabbos. But no matter how hard I work on shabbos, every week come Thursday night and I am counting down the minutes until I get to light my candles. 

This didn’t come easy to me. I went through a phase where I wished that shabbos would come every ten days instead of every seven. So I thought a lot about what I want to get out of my shabbosim and totally reframed the way I think about. 

Instead of thinking about shabbos as a day of connection through rest, I now think about strengthening my relationship with Hashem by strengthening my relationship with my family and people I love. 

That means being totally present and mindful to the time I get to spend with my family on shabbos. This period in my life will only come once and I don’t want to take a minute of it for granted. I listen to their, sometimes long but always sweet, divrei torah with an attentive ear. I play games with them that we all enjoy. I make extra shabbos treats so that everyone can find exactly what they like to munch on while we sit and do puzzles. I set the table with a little extra love and attention to detail so that my family can sit down to a beautiful shabbos seaudah no matter how many seconds it takes for someone to spill their grape juice. 

Come time to make havdalah and every week, no matter how hard I worked all shabbos, I am always sad to see it go. Whether I napped or not, said the extra tehillim that I wanted to or not, finished reading the article that I started at least ten times throughout shabbos or not, I am relaxed and calm. 

Why?

Because at each stage, rest means different things to our souls. 

Now, at this stage in my life, resting my soul means giving my family as much of myself as I can. 

Every shabbos that I accomplish building my relationships with the people I love I know that I am now one step closer to my Creator as well. 

And that is why I love shabbos. 

NOW, ON TO THE FOOD!

                                 

This dish is actually super simple to make but packed with enough flavor to have people thinking it took you days!

It’s loaded with just the right amount of deep flavored spices, and the rich lamb is perfectly balanced out by the acid in the wine and oranges. It’s like a modern, American raised girls version of her Moroccan grandmother Lamb Tagine. 

For the printable Orange and White Wine Braised Lamb Stew click here

This post, is really part of a larger post that was the brilliant brain child of the uber-talnted Sina Mizrahi from the Gatheratable blog. She wrote an extremely beautiful post all about what shabbos means to her and over the course of two weeks posted her favorite shabbos recipes. To finish off the series she came up with the idea of a virtual pot lock. 

What’s a virtual pot luck you ask?

Well, it’s where Sina, myself and a bunch of other extremely talented and creative bloggers get together, divide up the different dishes that make up a shabbos seudah and each of us develop a recipe for that dish. 

We all posted our recipes on the same day, thus “bringing our food to the virtual pot luck”. If you put all our recipes together you will end up with an extremely delicious, creative and absolutely beautiful menu to prepare for shabbos.

What’s a pot luck though without people to share the food with? You’re all invited to join in our meal!!

To make it really easy for you, the links to everyone else’s recipes are below! 

So, click away to get in on the action and come have some fun!

Oh, and of course, SHABBAT SHALOM!

For Between Carpools egg wash tips click here
For Cooking in Heels “How to Hack a Challah” click here
For Spice and Zests Roasted Eggplant click here
For the Katamon Kitchen’s Salatim post click here
For the Sugar Box’s Red Snapper with Charred Patatoes, Tomatoes and Lemons click here
For Sina’s T’Bit: Iraqi Slow Cooked Chicken and Brown Rice click here
For my printable Orange and White Wine Braised Lamb Stew click here
For Kitchen Tested’s Roast Vegetable Platter click here
For Beth Warren’s Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups click here
For Jamie Gellers Cinnamon Bun recipe click here
For Busy in Brooklyn’s Funfetti Rice Krispie Bites click here
 

 

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Rosh Hashannah Salatim

For me salads are the best part of any meal. I love those cold, refreshing, crunchy bites in between all the hot food. Making salads on the other hand is the worst!

I force myself to make them on a daily basis because I love them and when I make them on my own I get to put in them exactly what I want. However, I would say that any salad that is not cut up and chopped by me is already halfway there to being my favorite salad. 

In an effort to make sure theres tons of cold crunchy veggies on my Rosh Hashannah table this holiday, I made a bunch of salads today that can stay in the fridge and get better everyday they sit! This way if I’m too tired or busy with kids, I at least know I can pull these out!

I made a carrot salad, a fennel salad, a sweet and sour type of eggplant salad, a garlic confit and a bunch of dips to put on the table at every meal. 

I hope everyones cooking is going well and can’t wait to see what you all made!

Happy Cooking!

For the printable Moroccan-y Carrot Slaw recipe click here

For the printable Fennel and Apple Slaw recipe click here

For the Pickled Eggplant and Onion recipe click here

For the printable Garlic Confit recipe click here

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5 More So Simple Salad Dressings

        

                      

Salads are so personal. The addition or subtraction of one single component in a salad can make it or break it for people. For me it’s tomatoes. You stick even a few cherry tomatoes in that salad and I’m out. I could love every other thing in there and be totally addicted to the dressing, but once the juice of the tomatoes touches the other veggies it goes from appealing to completely off limits. 

That’s why, a while back, I gave you all a post all about the dressings. We all pretty much know what we want or are in the mood to throw in our salads, but when it comes to the dressing I think thats where most people get stumped. They either stick to the same old boring dressing they’ve been making for months years, or, even worse, they use, GASP, bottled dressing. Ugh, I know. That stuff is just not right. 

Really though, once you understand the really basic principles of making a good dressing, it’s so easy to whip up your own. If your interested in what those are click here to go the original post. Also, thats where the first 6 salad dressing recipes are. 

So, here I am again, posting another 6 dressings recipe for you to help with your summertime salad habits. All I crave in this heat is something light, crunchy, fresh and flavorful. Which basically means I’m making some sort of salad every single night. Usually it’s a full meal in a salad. It’s packed with veggies, topped with some sort of protein (grilled chicken, deli, steak or even feta cheese or crispy chickpeas) lightly sprinkled with a little crunch in the form of crispy homemade croutons or crou”tot”s, and drizzled with most yummy and satisfying salad dressing. 

I hope these dressings make many, many appearances on all your dinner tables all summer long!

Happy Summer Everyone!

Peas Out, 

Danielle

For the printable Mango Sumac Vinaigrette recipe click here

For the printable Lightened Up Green Goddess Dressing recipe click here

For the printable Pomegranate Vinaigrette recipe click here

For the printable Raspberry Lime Vinaigrette recipe click here

For the printable Spicy Peanut Sesame Dressing recipe click here

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Spicy Peanut Sesame Noodles

FINALLY!!!!!

I have been trying to find time to post this recipe since the day I made it. When I say I have not even had a single second to just sit at my computer and get it done, it is not an exaggeration at all. This week was so insanely fun but so crazy busy.

Between flying to Florida for just a day to see mt grandfather, photography lessons (hence the ridiculously beautiful photos by the ohs talented Miriam Pascal), filming ten brand new videos for kosher.com, kids, husband oh and a few minutes of much needed sleep here and there this week was action packed. Even for me. And thats saying something. Luckily,I loved every minute of it.

Now that I have a few free seconds, I decided to use the time to bring you the recipe I promised I would. I know its a little late to make this for shakos but Im so confident in its level addiction that I felt like you needed to have it. 

Whether you make it for a shabbos afternoon, as a barbecue side dish, or as the perfect portable beach day lunch it is one of those recipes thats just perfect. It’s versatile and I included a bunch of variations in the recipe to help you make it even more to your liking! I never know when I make something like this whether mysids will eat to or not, but they all LOVED it. I actually kept the veggies separate and each kid customized what veggies they wanted in their bowls. 

Lets talk about these photos. No, I did no take these insanely gorgeous pictures. They were taken by the uber-talented Miriam pascal from overtimecook. I had the unbelievable privilege of hanging out with Miriam and the equally talented Melinda from kitchen-tested. We got together, well actually, they got together and I crashed their photoshoot, to photograph some new recipes. Not only were they gracious enough to let me watch and learn from everything they did, they even told me to bring a recipe that they would tech me how to photograph! 

I don’t think I’m quite ready to produce any pictures that look as gorgeous as these, actually I probably need to buy a real camera first, but I can’t wait to get back home and start implanting all the tips and tricks they gave me. 

Hope your all having a slamming summer!

Peas out, 

Danielle 

For the printable Spicy Peanut Sesame Noodle Recipe, click here

 

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