BEST MEAT SAUCE EVER

Meat sauce should be all about the meat. It should have deep, rich beef-y flavor that is so delicious and mildly addictive that technically you could eat it all by itself with just a spoon. 

Like any good sauce based food though, it needs to flavorful enough so that the taste totally stands out when eaten with a some good baguette, over past, rice or even zoodles. 

That is what this meat sauce is about. Flavor, texture and taste. 

I can’t take the credit it bc I learned how to make meat sauce from the my mother, who taught me all about not overworking the meat and teaching me the  joys of a textured sauce! 

So thanks mom! 

Make sure to double the recipe, bc meat sauce freezes amazing, is loved by all and can help you on a busy when you need a fast dinner! 

For the printable Meat Sauce recipe click here

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10 CHICKEN MARINADES + HOW TO STOCK YOUR FREEZER LIKE A BOSS

              

                                 

               

                                 

Theres nothing like fresh food. 

There’s also nothing like a day where you ran a million errands, got a flat tire that took an hour to fix, received a phone call that you left your credit card in one fo the stores you went into on your million errand run so you have to go back to said store and sit in the random 2:00 pm traffic again, to finally get home and remember that the little people who co-inhabit your home will somehow need to be fed. 

These are precisely the times having premarinated chicken in your freezer saves the day. 

Is it really so hard to throw some sauce on chicken and stick it in the oven?

No. It’s not. 

But, when you have so many other thing goings on, whether its a full work schedule, a busy week of holiday preparations or just a regular Wednesday (why are Wednesdays always so crazy?), it’s nice to know you can have a yummy home made meal with out getting a single dish dirty!

That’s right. You prep all these chicken when they’re fresh, freeze them in the marinade and then all you have to do is cook em up! It could not be simpler. 

Well, I guess you actually could cook them first then freeze them, but really, I don’t recommend that. There something about cooked frozen chicken that just isn’t right. Maybe it’s the texture, Maybe its in the reheating process, whatever it is, it’s just not ideal. Sticking something in the oven , when everything is already chopped, mixed and cleaned is so easy that  why not cook it fresh. Also, then its fresh. And hot out of the oven chicken, is always a crowd pleaser. 

So, I’ve put together 10 different recipes for you, together in one place, just to maker your life easier. I figure with ten recipes theres definitely a few out there for each of you. This way you could take 1 hour (yup, you can marinade all ten of these in less than hour)on a Sunday and be set for the next month!

A note about freezing:

I like to freeze these in ziplock bags. I squeeze out as much air as possible from the bags and somehow I think this helps the marinade really penetrate the chicken and and a whole extra burst of flavor. I also like to lay the ziplock bags flat into a 9×13 pan in the freeze sxo that during the freezer process if theres any drips I can just throw out the pan. Once all the chicken is frozen I remove the pan and stand my ziplock up vertically. This way I can always see what I have, its easy to take out and takes up way less space in the freezer to save room for things that are really important. Like ice cream. 

Also, please not that you can change up the cuts of chicken I use to reflect cuts that your family likes. 

Hope this helps you all this holiday season and all your long!

Happy freezer stocking!

βœŒπŸ»πŸ’œ&πŸ₯•,

Danielle

  1. For the printable Apricot Soy Chicken marinade recipe click here
  2. For the printable Sticky Buffalo Bbq Chicken marinade recipe click here
  3. For the printable Moroccan-ish Olive Chicken marinade recipe click here
  4. For the printable Caesar Chicken marinade recipe click here
  5. For the printable Scallion Lime Chicken Cutlet marinade recipe click here
  6. For the printable Harissa Lemon Olive Chicken  marinade recipe click here
  7. For the printable Fig and Balsamic Chicken marinaderecipe click here
  8. For the printable Lemon Herb Chicken marinade recipe click here
  9. For the printable Pomegranate Teriyaki Chicken marinade recipe click here
  10. For the printable Chili Garlic Chicken marinade recipe click here

 

 

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VERY SAVORY DRY RUB BRISKET

I love a good piece of meat. Lately I’ve been especially liking my meat to have as much meaty flavor, texture and scent as possible. That means no more over sweetened pulled beef, sweet ribs or sweet anything for that matter. I want a piece of uber savory meat that I can sink my teeth into. 

That is what this brisket is all about. It’s a dry rub with no sugar, that is balanced out by the addition of wine to add a layered of sweetness that is perfectly balanced with the natural acidities that wine posses. 

Since these holidays are crazy, I’ve been trying to cut out as many cooking steps as humanly possible. So, for this brisket (or deckle), I skipped the searing and just started it off in the oven uncovered to help create a nice crust. 

It’s easy to make, uses simple ingredients and tastes extremely savory and satisfying!

For the printable Very Savory Dry Rub Brisket recipe click here

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5 EASY MARINADES, 1 HOUR – stock your freezer with 5 premartinated proteins in no time! PART 2

                            

 

Part 2 of stocking your freezer does not just come with 2 simple meat recipes. It comes with an added bonus of an extremely time appropriate salad for you to serve the brick roast with. 

Why did I that? Because you all rock!

The truth is that I felt like when you buy a brick roast and have it butterflied you walk away with 2 pieces of meat. I wanted you to be able to serviette meat once on its own, because it’s that good and then once again in a different, dressed up, still exciting way. 

These holidays are all about food and having repetitive meals is a huge no-no for me. Of course there are always a few staple like chicken soup, schnitzel and potato kugel, but everything else has got to be original or I’m basically just forcing myself to eat!

So here you go. Today’s recipes are:

  • Easy Korean Ribs
  • Butterflied Brick Roast
  • Steak Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette + Chimmichurri

If you followed the this post and the last post you should now have 6 perfectly marinaded cuts of meat that just need to be simply thrown into an oven or on a grill! All you have left to do is, well, everything else. But at least the meat is off your head! 

For the printable Easy Korean Ribs click here

For the printable Butterflied Brick Roast click here

For the printable Steak Salad with Pomegranate Vinaigrette + Chimmichurri  click here

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5 EASY MARINADES, 1 HOUR – stock your freezer with 5 premartinated proteins in no time! PART 1

 

“Stocking your freezer is easy to do. Stocking your freezer the RIGHT WAY, is an art form.” -Me

Ok, so thats not a deeply profound quote that I suspect anyone will ever repeat, but I don’t think it’s a super important and helpful tip for the upcoming holiday season!

It’s super imoprtant to know what to freeze and what not to freezer. Especially when it come to protein. Don’t freeze a cooked steak. It will not be delicious. No matter how you freeze it, or how you defrost it. Do not freeze a cooked standing rib roast. I know there are some who do, but I’m against it. A giant hunk of meat, not covered in sauce, will take for ever to defrost and by the time it does the meat will have a weird freezer-y (yup, its a word) taste!

Here’s what you should freeze:

  • Raw proteins that are pre-marinaded. 

Why? Because in this situation the freezing will actually enhance the quality of the meat. The marinade will penetrate the protein in a much more flavor inducing way and all you have to do when you want to eat is defrost and follow the cooking instructions!

  • Proteins that are braised. 

Why? Something about the liquids it cooks in keeps the meats very soft and very tender even after defrosting and reheating. There sone key rule to braising though. The protein must NOT be removed from the cooking liquids until it has completely cooled. That means no touching. At all! The eat will completely dry out. During the cooling process the meat will reabsorb a lot of those cooking juices and if you take it out it won’t have any juicy goodness to soak up.

  • Cakes and cookies!

Why? No idea but they freeze and defrost beautifully. I actually find that some cakes taste better after they’ve defrosted from the freezer. My only rule with freezing baked goods is that they must be left whole. No cutting a cake in half. Sorry! Wrap the baked goods in a few layers of saran wrap and then foil to keep them safely away from any possible freezer burn. 

For part 1 of these5 easy marinades I’m giving you 3 recipes. 

   

Miso + Apricot Roasted Turkey Breast 

Garlic + Rosemary Lamb Shoulder

and

Duck Fat Roasted Breast Of Veal

All of these can be marinaded in minutes and cooked up fresh,  simply and easily!

HAPPY FREEZING EVERYONE!

For the Miso + Apricot Roasted Turkey Breast recipe, click here

For the Garlic + Rosemary Lamb Shoulder recipe, click here

For the Duck Fat Roasted Breast Of Veal recipe, click here

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CHEESE STUFFED FRIED OLIVES, 2 WAYS

  

I’m that person. You know, the one pretending to go wash my hands in a restaurant so that I can not so subtly look at whats on everyones tables. Or the one who walks by people sitting at a sidewalk table outside of a little pastaria in Italy and asks them what their eating because the smell coming off there table is so intoxicating that I just can’t resist. 

I’m Danielle, I love food. Nice to meet you. 

 We were lucky enough to spend this past in southern Italy with Miriam Schreiber on one of her legendary Legacy Tours trips. My children had the most amazing time touring ancient cities, volcanoes and roman ruins. I had the most amazing time staring at peoples plates. Every where we went there were little hole-in-wall restaurants/cafes serving the most simple looking, but ridiculously incredible smelling food. Obviously I had to stop and ask every single table of patrons we passed and ask them what they were eating. 

There were a few dishes that stood out in my mind that I knew I had to recreate. I had to wait for the perfect opportunity though to spring these recipes on you all. Some are a little too labor intensive for a regular dairy week night dinner. But, for Shavuous, a holiday that we are willing to go the extra step for to create a beautiful dairy kiddish or meal, is the perfect opportunity! 

You’ll have to wait a little longer for a few of the other dishes that MUST be recreated, but I wanted to start you off with a BANG. 

These olives were on sooooo many peoples tables. Usually, served as a small appetizer over a fresh, house made tomato sauce that was probably made from San Marzano tomatoes pick the day before!

We may not have fresh San Marzano tomatoes but we all have access to cheese, olives and breadcrumbs!

Do not miss the chance to make these olives. This is definitely not a recipe that you’ll try later.. You need to make these while the shavuous cooking feels are in the air! They take a few extra minutes to make but I included prep ahead instructions into the recipes!

Also, because I was so obsessed with them, and genuinely could not decided which h version of the olives I liked more (the green mozzarella stuffed or the kalamata labaneh stuffed), I included both recipes! I even included 2 different ways you can serve them! 

Oh, and BONUS, another awesome salad dressing!

Wishing you all a Happy Monday and of course, HAPPY COOKING!

βœŒπŸ»πŸ’œ & πŸ₯•,

Danielle

                        

For the printable LABANE STUFFED FRIED KALAMTA OLIVES click here

For the printable MOZZARELLA STUFFED FRIED GREEN OLIVES click here

For the printable BALSAMIC AND SHALLOT VINAIGRETTE click here

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ORANGE & WHITE WINE MORROCAN BRAISED LAMB

SHABBOS

If you come here to peas love & carrots often, you know that normally the words just flow for me (the spelling not so much…). For some reason though, as I sit down to type up my thoughts on shabbos I feel like I’m struggling to properly put my feelings to words that accurately describe them. 

I’m conflicted between the spiritual side of me that loves to disconnect from our crazy world and take time to reconnect to our Creator and people we love, and the side of me that knows that as a mother of young children, shabbos doesn’t really mean a day of rest. 

I love to cook beautiful and delicious foods that are served on platters befitting the holiness of the day. I love to set the table with my nicest dishes and glasses. I adorn every plate with cloth napkins dressed in my favorite napkin rings. I start out shabbos with a sparkling kitchen, counters that are spotless, and everything in it’s place.

Then comes time to light the candles. It’s truly my favorite time of the week. In that millisecond where the whole world changes from a place that wasn’t something special and then with a simple bracha became a world filled with  holiness I am overcome by my desire to be close to Hashem and his Torah. 

All of that is real for me and inspires me. These days though shabbos also means something else. With a house full of little kids, it means serving food, clearing the table, sweeping, rinsing, resetting the table, heating up more food, serving more food and clearing more plates in addition to getting kids dressed, getting them redressed after they took off their clothing, picking up toys, changing diapers, and finding lost shoes. 

Sometimes it’s difficult to remember what excalty it is I love about shabbos. But no matter how hard I work on shabbos, every week come Thursday night and I am counting down the minutes until I get to light my candles. 

This didn’t come easy to me. I went through a phase where I wished that shabbos would come every ten days instead of every seven. So I thought a lot about what I want to get out of my shabbosim and totally reframed the way I think about. 

Instead of thinking about shabbos as a day of connection through rest, I now think about strengthening my relationship with Hashem by strengthening my relationship with my family and people I love. 

That means being totally present and mindful to the time I get to spend with my family on shabbos. This period in my life will only come once and I don’t want to take a minute of it for granted. I listen to their, sometimes long but always sweet, divrei torah with an attentive ear. I play games with them that we all enjoy. I make extra shabbos treats so that everyone can find exactly what they like to munch on while we sit and do puzzles. I set the table with a little extra love and attention to detail so that my family can sit down to a beautiful shabbos seaudah no matter how many seconds it takes for someone to spill their grape juice. 

Come time to make havdalah and every week, no matter how hard I worked all shabbos, I am always sad to see it go. Whether I napped or not, said the extra tehillim that I wanted to or not, finished reading the article that I started at least ten times throughout shabbos or not, I am relaxed and calm. 

Why?

Because at each stage, rest means different things to our souls. 

Now, at this stage in my life, resting my soul means giving my family as much of myself as I can. 

Every shabbos that I accomplish building my relationships with the people I love I know that I am now one step closer to my Creator as well. 

And that is why I love shabbos. 

NOW, ON TO THE FOOD!

                                 

This dish is actually super simple to make but packed with enough flavor to have people thinking it took you days!

It’s loaded with just the right amount of deep flavored spices, and the rich lamb is perfectly balanced out by the acid in the wine and oranges. It’s like a modern, American raised girls version of her Moroccan grandmother Lamb Tagine. 

For the printable Orange and White Wine Braised Lamb Stew click here

This post, is really part of a larger post that was the brilliant brain child of the uber-talnted Sina Mizrahi from the Gatheratable blog. She wrote an extremely beautiful post all about what shabbos means to her and over the course of two weeks posted her favorite shabbos recipes. To finish off the series she came up with the idea of a virtual pot lock. 

What’s a virtual pot luck you ask?

Well, it’s where Sina, myself and a bunch of other extremely talented and creative bloggers get together, divide up the different dishes that make up a shabbos seudah and each of us develop a recipe for that dish. 

We all posted our recipes on the same day, thus “bringing our food to the virtual pot luck”. If you put all our recipes together you will end up with an extremely delicious, creative and absolutely beautiful menu to prepare for shabbos.

What’s a pot luck though without people to share the food with? You’re all invited to join in our meal!!

To make it really easy for you, the links to everyone else’s recipes are below! 

So, click away to get in on the action and come have some fun!

Oh, and of course, SHABBAT SHALOM!

For Between Carpools egg wash tips click here
For Cooking in Heels “How to Hack a Challah” click here
For Spice and Zests Roasted Eggplant click here
For the Katamon Kitchen’s Salatim post click here
For the Sugar Box’s Red Snapper with Charred Patatoes, Tomatoes and Lemons click here
For Sina’s T’Bit: Iraqi Slow Cooked Chicken and Brown Rice click here
For my printable Orange and White Wine Braised Lamb Stew click here
For Kitchen Tested’s Roast Vegetable Platter click here
For Beth Warren’s Dark Chocolate Peanut Butter Cups click here
For Jamie Gellers Cinnamon Bun recipe click here
For Busy in Brooklyn’s Funfetti Rice Krispie Bites click here
 

 

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BOURBON APPLE TURNOVERS

     

Every year I make these and I’m always switching up the “wrapper” that holds the treasure of the most delicious apple filling. I’ve use everything from puff pastry, to phyllo dough to wonton wrappers. And you know what, they’re all awesome. 

This year I discovered frozen pie dough and I am officially hooked. I’m usually more of a “from scratch” person but when it comes to baking, especially marathon holiday baking, I’ll take any shortcut I can get. The pie dough is so easy to use and so yummy that I decided to use it as my “wrapper” for the bourbon apple filling. 

As happy as I am with the results of the pie dough I am still a firm believer that no matter what you put on the outside of the bourbon apple mixture it will still be the best form of apple you eat this entire fall.

Why?

Because. 

BOURBON. 

Which ever wrapper you choose to make it in, all options are freezer friendly. Just fill ’em, seal ’em tight, and freeze ’em. Lay them in a single layer on a sheet pan, freeze till hard, then transfer to a tourer ware or ziplock bag. 

To cook them, remove them from the freezer and while STILL FROZEN lay them on a baking sheet to defrost. (If you wait till they are defrosted to separate and place them on the baking sheet it will be much harder). Once defrosted egg them, sprinkle some sugar and bake away!

Happy cooking everyone!

For the printable Bourbon Apple Turnovers recipe click here

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